Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.
I first learned about you when I downloaded your free e-book, How to Make Money – BLOGGING, via Amazon Kindle. It was a sure one-sitting kind of book but is very meaty. I got all the wonderful ideas from your book and finally decided to visit your website to harvest some more inspiration. I am so glad my path was directed here because I also have just started my incognito blog.

First of all, a concrete goal like yours is a great way to start your job hunt: you know exactly how much money you need and what you want to use it for, so you don't need any extra incentive to get out there and start earning. Start by writing down your monetary goal of $181.16 and then keeping track of any money you make along the way so you can monitor your progress toward that goal. After that, start your job hunt! If you don't have any local grocery stores or shops that will hire fourteen-year olds, ask your parents and family friends if you can start a babysitting gig or odd jobs like yard work. If that doesn't work, try getting your family together to have a yard sale or a bake sale. It probably won't make all the money you need in one go, but remember that every little bit helps you on your way to the magic number! Also start collecting soda cans and turning them into recycling centers in order to collect the 10-cent per can deposit. You'll be surprised how quickly little things like this can add up!http://www.thepennyhoarder.com/collecting-cans/


These aren’t the only ways teens can make money online. If you explore other options, proceed with caution. Read user reviews before signing up for any website to avoid getting caught up in scams. At best, those are a waste of time. At worst, they can cost you money and put you at risk for identity theft. If you aren’t sure a site is legitimate, stick to the basic rule of thumb: If it sounds too good to be true — like the employer that doesn’t ask to see a resume but offers to hire you on the spot — it probably is.
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